• New Youtube video by Suthukazi Arosi
    BLACK AND WHITE is a song about us - human beings with all the hatred that has turned against all humanity for centuries. Civilised as we are but still dwelling on racism.
  • Sweet Lu Olutosin released a very entertaining Soul-Jazz album
    With a Billboard #1 Traditional Jazz album to his credit and a mission to rejuvenate the souls of audiences everywhere, "Sweet Lu" Olutosin continues to shine the light of his 'spirit music' with his latest release "Meet Me At The Crossroads".
  • How much is present day Zimbabwe affected by Mugabe's legacy?
    Zimbabwe is currently in a state of upheaval as it is facing a national shutdown organised by anti-government citizen groups and human rights activists, which in return resulted in the crackdown of the government on its opposition and the shutdown of internet access to the country.
  • The highly anticipated follow-up EP "Giants" is officially dropped!
    In Capelle’s own words: “I want people who listen to my music to feel like they know me.
  • A message from the global messenger
    Master Chef Bibb is serving us so many different dishes and flavours with this release - 24 in total - that there is simply no way of denying or disliking what he has on offer. 
  • Personal Perspectives #2
    Personal Perspectives is an interview series, a platform on which we invite people to share their perspective on issues that affect us all.  UbuntuFM recently linked up with Abubakar Adam Ibrahim, writer, journalist and intellectual of note from Nigeria.  
  • Funky Soulsteady Beat from Washington D.C. & Belgium
    The Badasonics mixes Soul and Funk together with Jamaican riddims and horns with the soulful rock and Reggae voice of Caz Gardiner to deliver a pulsating party of soul steady beats.
  • Are we able to rethink ourselves?
    The global warming debate keeps on popping in and out of our news headlines. It involves us all, yet not all of us are involved. Why?
  • The backstory to this track is as interesting as the track itself
    It was 1974, and Toronto was undergoing a cultural shift. The usual pop fare was starting to assimilate the rhythms of the Caribbean – not just Soca, and calypso – but a music known and beloved by those who immigrated from Jamaica called, ‘Reggae.’